Sat, 28 Nov 2020

A joint UN-hosted donor conference to rally international support behind Myanmar's displaced Rohingya minority, ended on Thursday with a promise to continue engaging with concerned countries towards finding a long-term solution to their plight.

"We will continue to work together to maintain international attention on the Rohingya crisis and to shift from short-term critical interventions, to a more sustained and stable support", said the closing statement from co-hosts the UN refugee agency (UNHCR), the European Union (EU), United Kingdom and United States.

"We are grateful to all who have participatedincluding those who have announced or pledged funding for the international humanitarian response, those who are supporting members of the Rohingya communities in other ways - not least by hosting them - and most importantly, representatives of Rohingya communities themselves", the statement continued.

The appeal comes more than three years after the orchestrated violence that erupted in Myanmar, across Rakhine state, which saw hundreds of thousands of mainly-Muslim Rohingya flee their homes, in search of safety across the border in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

There are currently 860,000 Rohingya refugees in and around Cox's Bazar, and an estimated 600,000 still in Rakhine state, who face ongoing violence and discrimination; and Malaysia, India, Indonesia, and other countries in the region, are together hosting nearly 150,000 Rohingya refugees.

Voluntary, safe, dignified return

"The voluntary, safe, dignified, and sustainable return of Rohingya refugees and others internally displaced to their places of origin or of their own choosing in Myanmar, is the comprehensive solution that we seek along with Rohingya people themselves", the joint communique stated.

"To that end, we underscore the Secretary General's call for a global ceasefire and the cessation of fighting to enable safe and unimpeded humanitarian access to all communities in need of assistance."

The co-chairs urged Myanmar's Government to resolve the crisis, and "take steps to address the root causes of the violence and displacement", creating the conditions that would allow for sustainable returns.

"This includes providing a pathway to citizenship and freedom of movement for Rohingya, guided by the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State's recommendations and encouraged and supported by countries in the region. Myanmar must provide justice for the victims of human rights abuses and ensure that those responsible are held accountable", the statement continued.

Expressing thanks and support to the Government and people of Bangladesh, the co-chairs stressed that increased support for Rohingya, must go hand-in-hand with increased support for host communities.

"While we continue efforts to secure long-term solutions, a focus on more sustainable response planning and financing in Bangladesh, could more effectively support the government's management of the response and maximize limited resources to benefit both Bangladeshi and refugee communities."

$600 million pledged

The co-chairs announced new pledges of around $600 million in humanitarian funding, which significantly expands the nearly $636 million in assistance already committed so far in 2020 under the Bangladesh Joint Response Plan and the Myanmar Humanitarian Response Plan.

The crisis is having a "devastating effect on vulnerable members of Rohingya communities, particularly women and children who require gender and age-sensitive interventions" said the co-chairs, leading to vulnerable refugees "desperately attempting to reach other countries in the region.

UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) Executive-Director, Henrietta Fore, said that thanks to Bangladesh and generous donors worldwide, UNICEF and other UN agencies such as UNHCR, migration agency IOM, World Food Programme WFP, and many NGOs, continue to serve and support vulnerable Rohingya children.

In addition to providing vital services such as health, nutrition, and sanitation, education is "critical for young Rohingyas to build better futures. And to one day voluntarily return and reintegrate into Myanmar with the safety and dignity they deserve."

Support for 170,000 Rohingya children

"We're giving parents and caregivers the training and tools they need to support their children's education. More than 170,000 Rohingya children are being supported this way", she said.

"Join our call to ensure a place for Rohingya children in both countries' education systems and programmes. They need education where they live", she told the conference.

Ms. Fore called on donors not to forget the daily struggles of Rohingya children who remain inside Myanmar. "They're still facing discrimination, horrifying violence and intensifying conflict every day. The fighting needs to stop so children can return to school and play, and so refugees can return home safely if they choose."

Rohingyas themselves 'backbone of the response'

UN Emergency Relief Coordinator, Mark Lowcock, said it was vital to recognize that the Rohingya refugees themselves have been "the backbone of the response."

"They volunteer as health workers, they distribute masks and they help protect their communities from the pandemic. And I think we are all need to be very grateful to them and encourage them to take up this kind of responsibility."

Highlighting again the Rohingya communities that remain in Myanmar, he said 130,000 of them remain displaced in central Rakhine State where they have been since 2012, and another 10,000 have been displaced since 2017 in northern Rakhine.

"Those people continue to have their basic rights denied, they suffer extreme hardships in Rakhine State and elsewhere", added relief chief Lowcock.

(Photo credit: K.M. Asad | LightRocket).

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