Thu, 09 Apr 2020

NEW YORK, New York - The State of New York will not be appealing the case it jointly pursued with twelve other states against the $26 billion T-Mobile/Sprint merger.

The states were unsuccessful in their legal challenge against the merger.

New York Attorney General Letitia James on Sunday confirmed that New York would not be supporting an appeal, an indication that none of he states will move in that direction.

"I'd like to thank California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and the 12 additional attorneys general from around the nation for their partnership throughout this lawsuit. After a thorough analysis, New York has decided not to move forward with an appeal in this case," James said in her statement Sunday. "Instead, we hope to work with all the parties to ensure that consumers get the best pricing and service possible, that networks are built out throughout our state, and that good-paying jobs are created here in New York."

"We are gratified that this process has yielded commitments from T-Mobile to create jobs in Rochester and engage in robust national diversity initiatives that will connect our communities with good jobs and technology. We are committed to continuing to fight for affordability and access for all of New York's mobile customers," attorney general James added.

The decision by New York follows the Federal Court decision on Tuesday to block the states' application to derail the merger.

James's statement on Sunday was in stark contrast to the one she issued on Tuesday after the Federal Court handed down its decision.

"Today's decision marks a loss for every American who relies on their cell phone for work, to care for a family member, and to communicate with friends," she said then. "From the start, this merger has been about massive corporate profits over all else, and despite the companies' false claims, this deal will endanger wireless subscribers where it hurts most: their wallets. There is no doubt that reducing the mobile market from four to three will be bad for consumers, bad for workers, and bad for innovation, which is why the states stepped up and led this lawsuit."

"We disagree with this decision wholeheartedly, and will continue to fight the kind of consumer-harming megamergers our antitrust laws were designed to prevent. As we review our options, including a possible appeal, Americans should continue to hold the companies to account for their promises," she added.

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